Gangster Government growing

Posted: April 28th, 2010 by Militant Libertarian

by Michael Barone, BostonHerald

Almost a year ago, in a column on the Chrysler bailout, I reflected on the Obama administration’s decision to force bondholders to accept 33 cents on the dollar on secured debts while giving United Auto Worker retirees 50 cents on the dollar on unsecured debts.

This was a clear violation of the ordinary bankruptcy rule that secured creditors are fully paid off before unsecured creditors get anything. The politically connected UAW folk got preference over politically unconnected bondholders. “We have just seen an episode of Gangster Government,” I wrote. “It is likely to be a continuing series.”

Fast forward to last Friday, when the Securities and Exchange Commission filed a complaint against Goldman Sachs, alleging that the firm violated the law when it sold a collateralized debt obligation (CDO) based on mortgage-backed securities without disclosing that the CDO was assembled with the help of hedge fund investor John Paulson.

This week came the news, undisclosed by the SEC Friday, that the commissioners approved the complaint by a 3-2 party-line vote. Ordinarily, the SEC issues such complaints only when the commissioners unanimously approve.

Democrats immediately used the complaint to jam Sen. Christopher Dodd’s financial regulation through the Senate.

You may want to believe the denials that the Democratic commissioners timed the action in coordination with the administration or congressional leaders. But then you may want to believe there was no political favoritism in the Chrysler deal, too. The SEC complaint looks a lot like Gangster Government to me.

The Dodd bill, however, has it trumped.

At the top of the list is the $50 billion fund that the Federal Deposit Insurance Corp. could use to pay off creditors of firms identified as systemically risky – i.e., “too big to fail.”

CEOs might want to have receipts for their contributions to Sen. Charles Schumer and the Obama campaign in hand when they apply.

Then there are carve-out provisions provided for particular interests. “Obtaining a carve-out isn’t rocket science,” one Republican K Street lobbyist told the Huffington Post. “Just give Chairman Dodd and Chuck Schumer a s—load of money.”

Read the rest at this link.


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